Home Japanese values NEH Awards Four Scholarships and One Digital Arts and Humanities Scholarship from Keough School Faculty | News | Notre Dame News

NEH Awards Four Scholarships and One Digital Arts and Humanities Scholarship from Keough School Faculty | News | Notre Dame News

0
Main Building (Photo by Barbara Johnston/University of Notre Dame)

Three faculty members from the University of Notre Dame College of Arts and Letters and one from the Keough School of Global Affairs have won scholarships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, extending the University’s record success with the federal agency committed to supporting original research and scholarship.

Sara Bernstein
Sara Bernstein

Sara Bernstein, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy; Tarryn Chun, assistant professor in the Department of Film, Television and Theatre; Katie Jarvis, Carl E. Koch Associate Professor in the Department of History; and Sharon Yoon, assistant professor of Korean studies, are part of the class of comrades announced by the NEH this week. Notre Dame also received a significant grant for a digital scholarship project led by Robert Goulding, director of the Reilly Center for Science, Technology and Values, in partnership with the Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship and its director, Scott Weingart, as well as collaborators. at the Bodleian Library of the University of Oxford.

Since 2000, the Faculty of Arts and Humanities has received more NEH scholarships than any other private university in the country. NEH Fellowships are competitive awards given to scholars pursuing projects that embody outstanding research, rigorous analysis, and clear writing.

Bernstein, who is also affiliated with the Gender Studies program, will explore the metaphysics of intersectionality – the idea that various forms of social oppression interact and intersect in ways greater than the sum of their parts. The metaphysics of social categories is key to helping anyone understand how various factors or circumstances have shaped their identity, she said.

Tarryn Chun
Tarryn Chun

“For example: how would you have been a different person if you had been of a different biological sex than you are? It is, in many ways, a metaphysical question about what you hold fixed and what you vary in worlds where you are different,” Bernstein said.

Chun, who studies Chinese theater and visual culture, will explore the connections between aesthetics and technology for her project, “Spectacle and Excess in Global Chinese Performance.”

Since the opening ceremony of the Beijing Summer Olympics in 2008, large-scale multimedia theater has become a prominent performance genre in China and the Chinese-speaking world.

“This research is particularly relevant as theater absorbs lessons learned from being online during the pandemic and seeks to reinvent itself for post-pandemic stages and audiences,” said Chun, who holds a simultaneous appointment in the Department of East Asian Languages ​​and Cultures and is a faculty member of the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies. “We are at a time when theater artists around the world are wondering how to keep performances live in a digital world and under ongoing pandemic conditions.

Katie Jarvis
Katie Jarvis

A historian of early and late modern France, Jarvis would spend her scholarship writing her book, “Democratizing Forgiveness in Revolutionary France, 1789-1799”, which examines how ordinary citizens shaped modern politics and society in reinventing reconciliation. She explores how revolutionaries, having wrested the power of forgiveness from the king and the Church, reshaped forgiveness en masse and channeled political overtones into routine. citizen relations.

Jarvis, who is also a faculty member at the Nanovic Institute for European Studies and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and an affiliate professor in the Gender Studies program, said people are “mending broken ties arbitrating local disputes, canceling personal loans and settling debts in court”. . And they reconceptualized reconciliation through sacramental confession, innovative religious worship, and youth education.

Sharon Young
Sharon Young

With a grant from the NEH’s New Directions for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions program, Notre Dame and Oxford researchers will develop a new platform that will facilitate the analysis, presentation and reuse of digital archives. Goulding, who is also an associate professor in the Liberal Studies Program and director of the doctoral program in the history and philosophy of science, will lead the development of a proof-of-concept for an interoperable text framework (ITF) – a loose term for a bodies of conventions and contracts that specify how to format data and its associated metadata so that it can be used by several different platforms. The team plans to develop an improved and accessible platform capable of hosting images as well as text transcripts and complex diagrams with contemporary navigation and annotation tools.

To test the platform, the team will update an old digital project – ‘The Manuscripts of Thomas Harriot (1560-1621)’, which Goulding co-edited – which illustrates the challenges the ITF may face in its development and the types and extent of problems. it will solve.

Yoon, also affiliated with the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies at the Keough School, received a fellowship from NEH and the Japan-US Friendship Commission to research anti-racism movements that support Korean minorities living in Japan.

Robert Goulding
Robert Goulding

For her project, “Social Media Activism and the Fight against Hate in Osaka’s Koreatown,” Yoon will analyze how social networking sites have opened new avenues for civic engagement in Japan. In particular, she will study how physical environments such as Korean enclaves shape how activists share information and resources to effect legislative change. Third- and fourth-generation Korean activists, known as zainichi Koreans, led a counter-movement to end far-right hate rallies targeting Korean communities between 2013 and 2015. Bringing together a broad coalition of left-wing activists , LGBTQ minorities, human rights defenders lawyers and ordinary Japanese citizens, counter-activists were able to pressure local politicians to implement Osaka’s first anti-hate speech ordinance and, later, a National Hate Speech Bill in 2016.

“I want to understand how a group of disenfranchised minorities could get such concrete legislative measures so quickly,” Yoon said. “Koreans in Zainichi make up just over 1% of Japan’s population, are descendants of migrant workers who once worked in slave-like conditions and who, in some cases, continue to occupy the lowest rungs of the society.